790 results for author: Brad Jersak


CWR Video – On the Word of God – Brad Jersak


Q&R with Brad Jersak: What about “God’s wrath” in the NT?

Question Hi Brad, Just bought and read A More Christlike God. I loved the book! I really want to believe your theology of wrath – but how do you explain these NT verses that refer to wrath? Is it all explained by "giving over"? For example: John 3:36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God’s wrath remains on them.Romans 2:8 But for those who are self-seeking and who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger.Ephesians 5:6 Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of such things God’s wrath comes on those who are disobedient.Colossians ...

Near-Death Experiences: a Conversation with Brad Jersak

Reader How should we receive such numerous stories of people who claimed to have near-death experiences and experienced heaven/hell, especially since the impact upon their audiences cannot be overlooked? These stories have been used to inspire people to follow Jesus either because of the riches of heaven or the utter fear of a horrendous hell.  Optional follow-up: How do we take those NDE stories that more closely describe the traditional version of hell of eternal torment? Brad Thanks for the good question. Here are some stray puzzle pieces to consider: 1. Near-death experiences are just that. They are experiences of almost ...

Q&R with Brad: “Is reading the Bible through the Gospel ‘eisegesis'”?

Question: From Brad Jersak, "Gospel Before Translation (3/3)": "What I’m saying is that your criteria for judging a translation is not your linguistic ability or your academic credentials. It is your personal knowledge of who Jesus is, the nature of God as he revealed it, and the gospel he preached." Brad ... is that not getting a little close to eisegesis? My personal growth is so much dependent on my openness to God revealing things to me about Himself and myself, that are sometimes very challenging of my well-formed, and dysfunctional, personal theology. Response: What a good question. So... no and yes, depending on ...

Gospel Before Translation (pt. 3/3) – Brad Jersak

Gospel Before Translation: In parts 1 & 2 of this series, I claimed that the first Christian interpreters established in their hearts the gospel of Jesus Christ before they attempted to translate or interpret the Scriptures. Apart from that gospel, they believed the Bible could not be understood, much less translated, as inspired Scripture. The gospel formed and affected all of their translation work. Sadly, modern translators seem to pretend to be unbiased by their theology (but of course they are). Our first two examples came from Isaiah 53:10, which affects our view of God, and Jeremiah 17:9, which informs our view of humanity. While modern ...

The Gospel In Nonviolence – Stephen Crosby

The following is a true story that clearly demonstrates the essence of the gospel in nonviolence. I wept in thankfulness the first time I read this. It is an incident cited by Kenneth Bailey[i] involving King Hussein of Jordan, and confirmed through high-ranking American intelligence officers stationed in Jordan at the time this event took place: King Hussein of Jordon One night in the early 1980’s, the king was informed by his security police that a group of about seventy-five Jordanian army officers were at that very moment meeting in a nearby barracks, plotting a military overthrow of the kingdom. The security officers requested permission ...

Gospel Before Translation (pt. 2/3) – Brad Jersak

Gospel Before Translation: In part 1 of this series, I claimed that the first Christian interpreters established in their hearts the gospel of Jesus Christ before they attempted to translate or interpret the Scriptures. Apart from that gospel, they believed the Bible could not be understood, much less translated, as inspired Scripture. The gospel formed and affected all of their translation work. Sadly, modern translators seem to pretend to be unbiased by their theology (but of course they are). Our first example came from Isaiah 53:10, where the NIV and KJV depicted God as taking pleasure in crushing the suffering servant (a type of Christ). But ...

Let the Children Teach Us – Katie Skurja

In these difficult and confusing times, we can all wonder if God is mad at us, if he has forgotten us or if he loves us anymore. Therapist Katie Skurja talks with some precious little ones -- they have an uplifting message for us.

Gospel Before Translation (pt. 1/3) – Brad Jersak

Reader's Question: What Translations Do You Prefer? Response: With all the English Bible translations available, most readers tend to pick a favorite based on either readability or accuracy. When reading the Old Testament, I prefer Robert Alter's translation, The Hebrew Bible, as it blends accuracy with style beautifully, and The Orthodox Study Bible, because its OT section is based on the Septuagint (LXX), the Greek version of the Hebrew canon translated before Christ and most popular among NT authors who cite it. When reading the New Testament, I love NT Wright's Kingdom New Testament because of its readability and David Bentley Hart's ...

CWR Video – How to See, Not What to See – Richard Rohr

Watch a 4 minute video with Richard Rohr.

“Preach the Word [Logos!]” Brad Jersak

"Preach the word..." —2 Timothy 4:2 How many times was I exhorted as a Bible College student to "preach the word"? My memories are admittedly reconstructive but here's how I recall those instances. I'm hiding in the balcony of the old chapel, trying to sneak in an extra 30 minutes sleep. One of my highly skilled Evangelical instructors is beseeching us with booming preacher's voice, waving his (always a "him") well-worn, leather-bound Study Bible before us. And he's nearly shouting, "Preach the word!" That is, when you preach, always preach from the Bible. Whatever you say must be found in and founded on this book, the inspired ...

Q&R with Brad Jersak – A Nonviolent God with Violent Prophets?

Question: In a talk I saw you give at an Open Table discussion, you cited 1 Sam. 15, the genocide of the Amalekites, and your conversation with a mentor. You seemed to be okay interpreting the story metaphorically.  That explanation is a big stretch for me. How can verse 3 (the command to slaughter) be a metaphor? Samuel was a bona fide OT prophet... and yet in verse 33, he kills Agag, hacking him to bits! God is good, is not destructive, but are we to believe his prophets are? Sure, they can have their faults, but a metaphor? I need help... lost in translation..." Response: Now you are seeing the reality of the Bible as a "text ...