789 results for author: Brad Jersak


Why I am an Atheist who Believes in God – Frank Schaeffer

Frank Schaeffer's new book was just published! Order the book today at the discounted price of $11.66.  CLICK HERE for the Amazon page link: “Why I…” is a beautiful high quality trade paperback available today worldwide and will be in all e-book  formats-- Kindle, Nook, i-Book --  by June 1. By Oct 1, the book will be in bookstores and libraries in the US and Canada. From the New York Times bestselling author of Crazy for God WHY I’M AN ATHEIST WHO BELIEVES IN GOD Caught between the beauty of his grandchildren and grief over a friend’s death, Frank Schaeffer finds himself simultane...

Razing Hell (excerpt) – Sharon Baker

Purchase Razing Hell When I was twenty-six, I found out I was going to hell. Young, impressionable, and without a strong faith, I listened intently as the pastor of a church I was visiting described in graphic detail the torturous, unquenchable flames that would burn human bodies—including, I presumed, mine—forever and ever. He spoke of worms eating away at decaying flesh, total darkness without the presence of God, and worst of all, no release from those horrors for all eternity. I certainly didn’t want to be one of those unfortunate many to feel the flames licking at my feet soon after leaving life in this world. So I took out the proper ...

5 Signs You May Have a Wrong View of God – Jason L Clark

If the truth sets us free, then it's safe to say that a lie holds us back. What we believe about the nature of God is of infinite importance. We are either growing in freedom or we are becoming disenfranchised. There is one foundational truth about God’s nature by which every other aspect of His nature should be measured: God is love (1 John 4:8). Jesus is the perfect expression of what love looks and sounds like, of what love does. He is perfect theology. A true view of God will free and empower sons and daughters to live like Jesus. We have been designed and created to know God as love and to be transformed in this truth. But slipping into ...

Thoughts in the Night on God’s Grace and Our Response – by Brad Jersak

Jet-lag woke me up again last night, but happily, instead of assaulting me with half-asleep worries or false epiphanies, the night-owl left me with a few follow-up thoughts to my article on Free Will, the Nous and Divine Judgment. For me, at least, they felt like clarifications on ye olde grace vs free will double-bind.  Briefly, classic Calvinism creates a double-bind re: the will. If grace is a unilaterally gift given by the will of God to the elect (Calvin's irresistible grace), then human response can seem either pre-determined or unnecessary. This seems wrong to me, since clearly, the Gospel is ...

Jesus Trumps Biblicism: A Tale of Sticks and Stones — by Brian Zahnd

Artwork by Lucie Beardwood This morning I was reading Scripture. From the Old Testament I was reading Numbers and in the New Testament I was reading John. In Numbers chapter 15 we find this story… An Israelite guy was gathering sticks on the Sabbath. This was forbidden. The guy got caught and was taken into custody. Moses inquired of Yahweh what should be done. Yahweh told Moses that the guy had to be killed. So the stick-gathering Sabbath-breaker was taken outside the camp and stoned to death by the congregation of Israel. Sticks and stones. (Number 15:32–36) Next I read from the Gospel of John chapter 5. This is what happens… ...

Free Will, the Nous and Divine Judgment: A Critical Analysis of Three Visions of Universalism — by Brad Jersak

I’ll say it again at the outset. I’m not a universalist. But some of my friends are … some of my evangelical friends, some of my Orthodox friends. So I ask them questions about that. This is not flirting (as Lewis and Barth were accused of), but simply being fair. In the name of ‘discernment,’ I’ve encountered a LOT of name-calling, dismissiveness, intentional misrepresentation and caricaturing. “Earth to Matilda!” – that’s not discernment. We can and must do better than that. Surely we could at least build bridges (from both ends of the chasm!) long enough so that listening could displace lobbing.    In ...

Beyond “Without the Shedding of Blood …” Brad Jersak

Beyond “Without the Shedding of Blood …” I must say, I am thoroughly enjoying Christian theology in the budding era of a post-retributive Gospel. With the Western rediscovery of the Beautiful News, I’m feeling—dare I say it—positively born again! I am in awe and worship of the Father of Love, the cruciform God enfleshed in Jesus of Nazareth. The symbol of the ‘old rugged cross’ has once again come to represent, for me, God’s essential nature: namely, his self-giving, radically forgiving, co-suffering love. And that’s good news for everyone! On the cross, in the face of human cruelty and bloodlust, God-in-Christ revealed his ...

Knocking Down Our Idols – by Caleb Miller

It has been said that "In the beginning God made man in His image, and man has returned the favor ever since". What does this mean? It means that in nearly every area our "theology" (thoughts and words we say about God) has been shaped by how we view ourselves. The opposite is also true, how we view our God is largely shaped by how we view ourselves. If we abhor something, we naturally assume that our God abhors the same thing. We can't stand people of a different sexual preference, so we assume that God cannot. And so it goes. We continue shaping God, molding Him into our image. We do as Paul said in Romans 1:23 - "making the incorru...

Water to Wine (some of my story) – Brian Zahnd

Ten years later it’s time to tell some of my story… I was halfway to ninety, midway through life, and I’d reached a full-blown crisis. Call it a garden variety mid-life crisis if you want, but it was something more than that. You might say it was a theological crisis, though that makes it sound too cerebral. The unease I felt came from a deeper place than a mental file labeled “theology.” My life was like that U2 song stuck on repeat — I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For. I was wrestling with an uneasy feeling that the kind of Christianity I had built my life around was somehow deficient. Not wrong, but lacking. It ...

Could your Evangelical Church be called a Cult? Alan Molineaux

If it quacks like a duck, walks like a duck, and looks like a duck then it is probably a duck: or so the saying goes. I have been part of the evangelical culture since 1975 when as a teenager I attended a small church in the east side of Manchester, England. At the time I was impressed by the community and the clarity with which they presented their ideas. Over the years, however, I have seen my fair share of dysfunctionality; some of which was my own.  There does seem to be a pattern in some of these moments that I believe is worthy of consideration. First of all let me say that I am committed to remaining within the evangelical ...

I Thought It Was Good News — by Chris Falson

This is a demo recording but by popular demand I am making this available before the actual album is recorded later this year.  This song (hopefully) speaks for itself... and while many have felt rejected by Jesus or God... the rejection really comes from people who either should know better... or don't really know at all. Share the song around, listen or download it for free or if you want to help fund the revolution purchase the track at the price of your choosing. Cheers! I Thought it was Good News by Chris Falson I Thought it was Good Newsby Chris Falson(c) Leather Chair Songs 2014There'll be no end to the holy warswhile the one in the ...

Faith Unraveled (Re-release of ‘Evolving in Monkey Town’) – Book by Rachel Held Evans

Eighty years after the Scopes Monkey Trial made a spectacle of Christian fundamentalism and brought national attention to her hometown, Rachel Held Evans faced a trial of her own when she began to have doubts about her faith. Growing up in a culture obsessed with apologetics, Evans asks questions she never thought she would ask. She learns that in order for her faith to survive in a postmodern context, it must adapt to change and evolve. Using as an illustration her own spiritual journey from certainty, through doubt, to faith, Evans adds a unique perspective to the ongoing dialogue about postmodernism and the church that has so captivated the ...