CWR Blog

Christianity Without The Religion BLOG hosted by Brad Jersak.

Faith Unraveled (Re-release of ‘Evolving in Monkey Town’) – Book by Rachel Held Evans

Eighty years after the Scopes Monkey Trial made a spectacle of Christian fundamentalism and brought national attention to her hometown, Rachel Held Evans faced a trial of her own when she began to have doubts about her faith. Growing up in a culture obsessed with apologetics, Evans asks questions she never thought she would ask. She learns that in order for her faith to survive in a postmodern context, it must adapt to change and evolve. Using as an illustration her own spiritual journey from certainty, through doubt, to faith, Evans adds a unique perspective to the ...

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The Long Road Back – James Webster

    Have you ever taken a wrong turn that left you many miles (the wrong way) from your intended destination? Looking back on the wasted time and energy, you probably thought something like “how could I have been so stupid?” Looking back you may remember how long it took you to get turned around and find your way (maybe even getting lost a few more times in the process) to your desired location. When you are totally lost, you don’t know which way to go and sometimes wander aimlessly searching for any clue as to what path to take. If you had ...

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Take Away the Religious Rocks – Greg Albrecht

Jesus, once more deeply moved, came to the tomb. It was a cave with a stone laid across the entrance. "Take away the stone," he said. —John 11:38-39 Religious rocks create barriers in our relationship with God. Notice the "red letter" words in our passage in John 11:39, the four words in this verse that Jesus actually spoke. Take away the stone.... The background for our passage begins in the first verse of chapter 11 of the book of John. Lazarus was sick. As the chapter unfolds we discover that Lazarus eventually died. His sisters Mary and Martha ...

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How Does “Dying For Our Sins” Work? – Brian Zahnd

How Does “Dying For Our Sins” Work? Brian Zahnd When we say “Jesus died for our sins,” what does that mean? It’s undeniably an essential confession of Christian faith, but how does it work? This much I’m sure of, it’s not reducible to just one thing. I’ve just finished preaching eight sermons on “The Crucified God” and I know I’ve barely scratched the surface of what the cross means. To try to reduce the death of Jesus to a single meaning is an impoverished approach to the mystery of the cross. I’m especially talking about those tidy explan...

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Resistance is Fertile: Christ is Risen and Death has Died — Brad Jersak

Christ is risen from the dead Trampling down death by death And upon those in the tomb bestowing life - Paschal Easter Hymn "Resistance is Futile" - the Borg Contrary to the boasting of most fictional alien invaders, resistance is not always futile. In truth, sometimes resistance is fertile. Case in point, a new friend was resisting the idea—even the possibility—that at the point of death, there may still be hope. Is death a locked door beyond which there is no further opportunity to hear and respond to the good news? My friend is sure of this. He cited ...

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What does God without retribution look like? Ask Jesus — by Michael Hardin

Nothing irks some folks more than losing a God who is wrathful, angry, retributive and punishing. This is only because we want so much to believe that God takes sides, and that side is inevitably our side.  So much of Jesus’s teaching subverts this sacrificial way of thinking. One example is the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector found in Luke 18:9-14, where what counts as righteousness is completely and totally turned on its head! If, in fact, as I argued in my last post, that Jesus begins his ministry by asking what God without retribution looks ...

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Cracked Jars and Golden Scars — by Brad Jersak

Ring the bells that still can ring Forget your perfect offering There's a crack, a crack in everything That's how the light gets in The religious ego -- our 'inner Pharisee' -- demands perfection, is embarrassed by our failings and punishes us for them with self-loathing. Co-opting the God-given conscience, it ascends to the judgment seat reserved for Christ alone and points the accusing finger of condemnation. The fruit is anxiety, shame and an intense desire to shrink back, to burrow into the mud and hide out our years. It reminds us of our inadequacy and sets ...

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Sympathy for the Devil…or Pilate by Brian Zahnd

Ecce Homo by Antonio Ciseri, 1871 Sympathy for the Devil…or PilateBrian Zahnd Please allow me to introduce myselfI’m a man of wealth and tasteI’ve been around for a long, long yearStole many a man’s soul and faithAnd I was ‘round when Jesus ChristHad his moment of doubt and painMade damn sure that PilateWashed his hands and sealed his fatePleased to meet youHope you guess my nameBut what’s puzzling youIs the nature of my game –The Rolling Stones, Sympathy for the Devil In his fascinating novel, The Master and Margarita, Russian writer ...

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Jesus: More Than a Man – by Greg Albrecht

       When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, "Who do people say the Son of Man is?" They replied, "Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still others, Jeremiah or one of the prophets." But what about you?" he asked. "Who do you say I am?" (Matthew 16:13-15).        More than two thousand years ago, Jesus asked his closest disciples the same question that he has asked humans ever since. Who do you say that I am? The answer his disciples gave then, and that you and I give today, ...

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“God Lets His Children Tell the Story”: An Angle on God’s Violence in the Old Testament — by Peter Enns

My seminary Hebrew professor, former colleague, and friend, Al Groves, who is of blessed memory, was a wonderful, honest, and pastoral man. When dealing with the theological difficulties that arise in the course of reading the Bible, Al would say, “God lets his children tell the story.” That is a great way of putting it. The Bible is what happens when God allows his children to tell his story–which means the biblical writers told the story from their point of view, with their limitations, within the cultural context in which they wrote. When children ...

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