11 results for tag: atonement


CWR video – “Why did Jesus die?” – Brad Jersak

Short video by Brad Jersak

Did Jesus’ Crucifixion Satisfy God’s Wrath? Greg Albrecht

An idyllic, beautiful setting surrounds a rambling country estate in rural England. It's 1935, and this pastoral setting provides the backdrop for the initial scene that plays out in Atonement. During the brief respite between the first and second World Wars, Cecilia Tallis, a rich young lady in her early twenties whose family owns the estate discovers she loves, and is loved by Robbie, a young man whose mother is the housekeeper at the Tallis home. As the love story begins, we are also introduced to Briony, Cecilia's younger sister. Briony is an aspiring writer who is, in her coming of age 13-year-old way, envious of the courtship enjoyed by ...

Did Jesus’ Crucifixion Satisfy God’s Wrath?

An idyllic, beautiful setting surrounds a rambling country estate in rural England. It's 1935, and this pastoral setting provides the backdrop for the initial scene that plays out in Atonement. During the brief respite between the first and second World Wars, Cecilia Tallis, a rich young lady in her early twenties whose family owns the estate discovers she loves, and is loved by Robbie, a young man whose mother is the housekeeper at the Tallis home. As the love story begins, we are also introduced to Briony, Cecilia's younger sister. Briony is an aspiring writer who is, in her coming of age 13-year-old way, envious of the courtship enjoyed by ...

The Suffering Judge – Greg Albrecht

… If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things? Who will bring any charge against those whom God has chosen? It is God who justifies. Who is he that condemns? Christ Jesus, who died—more than that, who was raised to life—is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us.—Romans 8:31-34 You probably have heard of honor killings. An "honor killing" is the term used to describe a practice in which one or more males murders a female relative who, according to their perspective, dishonored the family. H...

Exclamation Point on God’s Love: Greg Albrecht with Brad Jersak

The following is a transcript of a live interview with Brad Jersak by Greg Albrecht on the meaning of the Cross   Greg Albrecht: Hello everyone, this is Greg Albrecht. We're going to remember and discuss our Lord's ultimate sacrifice for us and reflect on his life, death, burial and of course the significance and meaning of his resurrection. Helping us with his insights and observations is Brad Jersak. Brad is Senior Editor of our magazines and a Christ-centered professor, speaker and author from Abbotsford, British Columbia. Brad, in one sense it seems to me that these two events, the crucifixion and the resurrection, are the crowning jewels ...

At-one-ment, Not Atonement – Richard Rohr

The common reading of the Bible is that Jesus “died for our sins”—either to pay a debt to the devil (common in the first millennium) or to pay a debt to God (proposed by Anselm of Canterbury, 1033-1109). Franciscan philosopher and theologian John Duns Scotus (1266-1308) agreed with neither of these understandings. Duns Scotus was not guided by the Temple language of debt, atonement, or blood sacrifice (understandably used by the Gospel writers and by Paul). He was inspired by the cosmic hymns in the first chapters of Colossians and Ephesians and the Prologue to John’s Gospel (1:1-18) and gave a theological and philosophical ...

“Breakfast with Brad” – Atonement means Reconciliation (Not Appeasement)

In this episode of Breakfast with Brad, he discusses the word "atonement," which historically meant "reconciliation" rather than "appeasement." Christ did not need to appease the wrath of God in order to reconcile God to us. Rather, as Paul says, "God was in Christ, reconciling the world to himself." That is, God sent his Son to invite us back home to the Father's house, assuring us that all is forgiven! Featured breakfast: leftover KFC and a can of Ginger Ale! PTM.org's "Breakfast with Brad" - Atonement means Reconciliation (Not Appeasement).

Gospel or Caricature? by Martin Scott

Editor's note: The following post first appeared at Martin Scott's Perspectives blog. In many ways, the caricature / gospel contrast mirrors what we see in the Gospel in Chairs (below). Agreeing with Scott, we would also tweak the atonement line. But if 'bearing our punishment' is not  'bearing God's just punishment for our sins,' but rather, 'bearing the unjust punishment we inflicted,' it works. Gospel or caricature? by Martin Scott Scot McKnight recently referred to Josh Butler’s second book: The Pursuing God: A Reckless, Irrational, Obsessed Love That’s Dying to Bring Us Home and summarises the (caricature / gospel) themes in the book, ...

God is not the Witch! C.S. Lewis on the Atonement – Brad Jersak

No Christian thinker has synthesized the rich and varied imagery of the gospel into a single beautiful picture as did C.S. Lewis in his classic novella, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Through Lewis’ children’s fantasy, the New Testament themes— redemption and reconciliation, substitution and sacrifice, ransom and victory—coalesce into one of literature’s greatest plotlines. After all, it is a retelling of the greatest story ever told!  Spoiler alert: I’ll summarize the epic climax shortly!  Plot: Four English adolescents pass through a magical wardrobe into the strange world of Narnia, which has fallen into a deathly ...

Calvary: Crucifixion as Torture, Cross as Hope – Brad Jersak

Trite or true, we're each and all on a journey, not quite sure whether any given year, week or moment is really ascent or descent -- the calm before a storm or the dark before dawn. I see this tension in the biblical story of Calvary, at once a crucifixion and a Cross, the intersection of goodness and affliction, of torture and hope. At Calvary, we see the violence of religious fanaticism married to national security ... and we see the humility, forgiveness and self-giving love of God. I hear this tension in Augustine, who is quoted in the movie, Calvary, as saying, "Do not despair; one of the thieves was saved. Do not presume; one of the thieves ...