7 results for tag: Lazar Puhalo


If you want to see folk damned, there is something wrong with you! – Randal Rauser

J.I. Packer has long distinguished himself as among the foremost evangelical critics of universalism. At the same time, he also made the following admission: “No evangelical, I think, need hesitate to admit that in his heart of hearts he would like universalism to be true. Who can take pleasure in the thought of people being eternally lost? If you want to see folk damned, there is something wrong with you!” Packer’s certainly right about that. And yet, the disturbing truth is that many conservative Christians don’t want universalism to be true. I wrote about this problem four years ago in “The very worst reason to reject ...

Herod Was Religious – Lazar Puhalo

Editor’s note: While many believers celebrate the birth of Christ on Christmas day, millions of others extend the celebration of the Incarnation through what they call ‘The Feast of the Nativity’ well into January. In so doing, they think of the Incarnation as encompassing, not only the birth of Christ, but his whole life as God-made-human.These are the days of the Nativity of our Lord God and Savior, the Incarnation of the living God, the Incarnation of co-suffering Love. The Sunday after the feast, the Gospel story of Herod and the Magi always holds a great revelation for us.I was asked recently asked online, “Does evidence disprove religi...

Fall 2016

Articles: Remembering 9-11: 15 Years Later - page 4 When Towers Fall - page 11 Five Stages of Religious Violence - page 14 Religion That's Lost Its Way - page 16 What's so "Christian" about Christianity? - page 17 "Fear Not" - page 18 Raising Children with Fearless Faith - page 20 The Dogs of Legalism: Can Religion Help with Stress? - page 21 The Therapeutic Massage of Prayer - page 25 George MacDonald's Spiritual Journey (& mine too) - page 26 House of Cards - page 27 Times of Refreshing and Restoration - page 31

Don’t Reinstate What Was Fulfilled and Abolished – Lazar Puhalo

If one were to carefully study the several ways in which Christ Himself turned much of the Old Testament on its head, one might end up being very surprised.   The woman taken in adultery was forgiven, not stoned. The Sabbath was not kept in order to demonstrate that the “Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath." He exalted and healed those who were not Jews, but "sinners" from among the nations. The Old Testament forbids the deformed, maimed and unclean to enter the temple; Christ fellowshipped with them and healed them. The Prophets rebuked the wealthy and Israel in general for ignoring the plight of the poor, the widow and ...

Judging others is self-condemnation (Matt. 7:1-5) – Lazar Puhalo

Judging others is self-condemnation.  Seek after the Light and find life.  MATTHEW 7:1-5:  Why are we equally judged when we judge others? "Do not judge or you will be judged; for you will be judged by the same judgment with which you judge others; and it will be measured out to you with the same measure you have used" (Mt. 7:1-2). If we judge others, we confess that we have a complete knowledge of truth and righteousness and can readily discern them. Nevertheless, not one of us actually fulfils righteousness and perfection in our own lives; thus we stand condemned by our own judgement, for the Saviour says ...

One Thing Is Needed – Lazar Puhalo

But one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her. Luke 10:42. Christians need to regularly examine whether we have mere religion, or are rather struggling to have a life in Christ and the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, which is the true goal of our Christian life.  Perhaps we might consider spending less energy trying to judge and condemn and correct others and focus far more on the condition of our own spiritual lives. It seems to me that the myth of a "holy nation" (i.e., one in which extreme political repression forces people to externally observe what one or another religious group ...

The Story of Jonah: Dare we hate those whom God loves? – Lazar Puhalo

Coptic Icon of Jonah The story of Jonah presents a quandary. The history of Nineveh and the Assyrians is well known and documented. The Assyrians left their own records and the nations around them had much to say of them. They were hated by all and proud of it.  Nineveh, however, never accepted the God of Israel and certainly never repented "in sackcloth and ashes." So what is the story of Jonah about?  This story unfolds at a time when Judah and Israel had become particularist. They were turned in on themselves and not even attempting to engage other nations with the worship of the true and living God. Indeed, the population ...